Research Economic Development

The Institute's Research

Date Published Title Description
September 2018 The Talent Report Over the next decade, a region's ability to provide a skilled workforce will be on top economically. Workforce development is inenextricably linked to successful economic development. Talent needs across industry sectors along with wages, projections and post secondary education awards are presented in this regional talent data profile.
April 2014 Living Wage Report The University of Scranton and The Institute collaborated to prepare the Living Wage Report - 2016. The report identifies the living wage needed to meet basic needs for different family compositions in NEPA. The report analyzes living wage against minimum and poverty levels and discusses challenges families face in meeting the cost of living for basic necessities if they work on a minimum wage [or even low wage occupations]. Various recommendations are identified for consideration.
October 2013 Anatomy of Double Digit Growth Multiple external forces help to shape regional economies. Several have been at play in Northeastern Pennsylvania and others may soon have an impact. This report explains these forces and demonstrates how NEPA is poised for future growth.
February 2010 Lackawanna & Luzerne County Business Patterns 1998-2007 The report begins with a summary of U.S. Census Bureau data for Lackawanna and Luzerne Counties, and Pennsylvania as a whole. The report then breaks down county business patterns annually. In its conclusion, the report evaluates county and state-wide data and identifies points of growth, decline, change, and stagnancy. The Institute hopes this report will prove informative in the prediction and management of northeastern Pennsylvania’s future business patterns.
September 2009 Job Sprawl in Northeastern Pennsylvania A report released in spring 2009 by The Brookings Institution, a Washington, D.C. based public policy organization, focused on job sprawl trends across 98 of the largest U.S. metropolitan areas. The report concluded that the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre metro region was ranked as the second most decentralized area, with considerable job sprawl. Further, the report concluded that the City of Wilkes-Barre is actually a suburb of Scranton, which further contributes to the sprawl. The Institute's study explains the methodology used in the Brookings report and demonstrates how such methodology does a disservice to the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre metro area, and many other metro areas around the U.S by focusing on population as opposed to jobs. This region has two strong core cities and strong second ring communities that have been established for a number of years.
November 2008 Lackawanna & Luzerne County Business Patterns 1998-2006 The report begins with a summary of U.S. Census Bureau data for Lackawanna and Luzerne Counties, and Pennsylvania as a whole. The report then breaks down county business patterns for 1998, 2002 and 2006. In its conclusion, the report evaluates county and state-wide data and identifies points of growth, decline, change, and stagnancy. JUSC hopes this report will prove informative in the prediction and management of northeastern Pennsylvania’s future business patterns.
January 2007 Best Practices of High Growth States A high growth state is one that displays a growing economy on a number of levels. The determinants of high growth in states include: overall population increases, percent change in real gross product, positive job growth, wage increases, and evidence of the majority of the citizenry going on to higher education - specifically those obtaining either primary degrees or terminal degrees. The top five states in each of the five categories have been identified through information obtained from the U.S. Census Bureau, Bureau of Economic Adjustment, and the Bureau of Labor Statistics data. A summary of each respective state’s attributes have been identified in regard to: quality of life; education [both K-12 and higher education]; cost of doing business and economic development policies; land use; transportation; cost of living; and housing affordability. The states with population growth, job growth, and greatest percentage change in real gross state product are primarily warmer in climate and west of the Mississippi, while states with wage increases and higher education attainment are primarily on the east coast (mostly in the mid-Atlantic region). After a cursory review, it appears that there are no consistent determinants among states. With the exception of Colorado, states with the most growth appear to have higher costs of living, more crime, and a weak Better Living Index. The difference is Colorado. Colorado’s Better Living Index is 100% — the highest in the nation. They are a leader in land use and transportation planning and development and have moderate costs and a lower crime rate.
June 2005 Regionalism: A Primer Partnerships across jurisdictional lines and that include public, private, and nonprofit stakeholders can contribute to the rebirth of northeastern Pennsylvania.
June 2005 Why Aren't We Average? This study assess the demographic indicators of the region and its history and trends to identify why we do not meet state and national averages on key demographics.
April 2005 Brookings Follow Up A Competitive Agenda For Renewing The Cities Of Northeastern Pennsylvania -- Strategies And Recommendations to Implement The Brookings Institution Report: "Back To Prosperity: A Competitive Agenda for Renewing Pennsylvania.

Our Partners

Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine
Johnson College
Keystone College
King's College
Lackawanna
Luzerne
Marywood University
Misericordia University
Penn State Wilkes-barre
Penn State Worthington Scranton
The Wright Center
The University of Scranton
Wilkes University